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10 Examples of Random Variables in Real Life - Statology

Details: Nov 04, 2021  · For example, a wolf may travel 40.335 miles, 80.5322 miles, 105.59 miles, etc. In this scenario, we could collect data on the distance traveled by wolves and create a probability distribution that tells us the probability that a randomly selected wolf will travel within a certain distance interval. Additional Resources

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Matched Pairs Design: Definition + Examples - Statology

Details: Feb 07, 2020  · Matched Pairs Design: Definition + Examples. A matched pairs design is an experimental design that is used when an experiment only has two treatment conditions. The subjects in the experiment are grouped together into pairs based on some variable they “match” on, such as age or gender. Then, within each pair, subjects are randomly assigned ...

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The 6 Assumptions of Logistic Regression (With Examples)

Details: Oct 13, 2020  · Assumption #1: The Response Variable is Binary. Logistic regression assumes that the response variable only takes on two possible outcomes. Some examples include: Yes or No. Male or Female. Pass or Fail. Drafted or Not Drafted. Malignant or Benign. How to check this assumption: Simply count how many unique outcomes occur in the response variable.

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How to Loop Through Column Names in R (With Examples)

Details: Oct 08, 2020  · Method 2: Use sapply () The following code shows how to loop through the column names of a data frame using sapply () and output the mean value of each column: #create data frame df <- data.frame (var1=c (1, 3, 3, 4, 5), var2=c (7, 7, 8, 3, 2), var3=c (3, 3, 6, 6, 8), var4=c (1, 1, 2, 8, 9)) #view data frame df var1 var2 var3 var4 1 1 7 3 1 2 3 ...

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How to Perform the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test - Statology

Details: Feb 24, 2020  · Step 3: Order the pairs by the absolute differences and assign a rank from the smallest to largest absolute differences. Ignore pairs that have an absolute difference of “0” and assign mean ranks when there are ties. Step 4: Find the sum of the positive ranks and the negative ranks. Step 5: Reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis.

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How to Read a Correlation Matrix - Statology

Details: Jan 27, 2020  · In practice, a correlation matrix is commonly used for three reasons: 1. A correlation matrix conveniently summarizes a dataset. A correlation matrix is a simple way to summarize the correlations between all variables in a dataset. For example, suppose we have the following dataset that has the following information for 1,000 students:

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Confidence Interval for the Difference Between Means ...

Details: Apr 20, 2020  · A confidence interval (C.I.) for a difference between means is a range of values that is likely to contain the true difference between two population means with a certain level of confidence. This tutorial explains the following: The motivation for creating this confidence interval. The formula to create this confidence interval. An example of how to calculate this …

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How to Apply the Empirical Rule in Excel - Statology

Details: Jan 27, 2020  · The Empirical Rule, sometimes called the 68-95-99.7 rule, states that for a given dataset with a normal distribution: 68% of data values fall within one standard deviation of the mean.; 95% of data values fall within two standard deviations of the mean.; 99.7% of data values fall within three standard deviations of the mean.; In this tutorial, we explain how to apply the …

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Confidence Interval for the Difference Between Means ...

Details: Apr 20, 2020  · A confidence interval for a difference between means is a range of values that is likely to contain the true difference between two population means with a certain level of confidence. The formula to calculate the confidence interval is: Confidence interval = ( x1 – x2) +/- t*√ ( (s p2 /n 1) + (s p2 /n 2 )) where: x1, x2: sample 1 mean ...

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4 Examples of Using Logistic Regression in Real Life ...

Details: Jun 25, 2020  · Logistic regression is a statistical method that we use to fit a regression model when the response variable is binary.. This tutorial shares four different examples of when logistic regression is used in real life. Logistic Regression Real Life Example #1

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How to Estimate the Mean and Median of Any Histogram

Details: Jan 19, 2021  · A histogram is a chart that helps us visualize the distribution of values in a dataset.. The x-axis of a histogram displays bins of data values and the y-axis tells us how many observations in a dataset fall in each bin. Although histograms are useful for visualizing distributions, it’s not always obvious what the mean and median values are just from looking at …

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Levels of Measurement: Nominal, Ordinal, Interval and Ratio

Details: Jan 03, 2020  · Interval scale: A scale used to label variables that have a natural order and a quantifiable difference between values, but no “true zero” value. Some examples of variables that can be measured on an interval scale include: Temperature: Measured in Fahrenheit or Celsius. Credit Scores: Measured from 300 to 850.

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How to Calculate Confidence Intervals on a TI-84 ...

Details: Apr 14, 2020  · A confidence interval (C.I.) is a range of values that is likely to include a population parameter with a certain degree of confidence. This tutorial explains how to calculate the following confidence intervals on a TI-84 calculator: Confidence interval for a population mean; σ known

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5 Real-Life Examples of the Binomial Distribution

Details: Mar 03, 2021  · The Binomial distribution is a probability distribution that is used to model the probability that a certain number of “successes” occur during a certain number of trials.. In this article we share 5 examples of how the Binomial distribution is used in the real world. Example 1: Number of Side Effects from Medications

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How to Find Class Intervals (With Examples)

Details: Jun 08, 2021  · In a frequency distribution, a class interval represents the difference between the upper class limit and the lower class limit.. In other words, a class interval represents the width of each class in a frequency distribution.. The following examples show how to calculate class intervals for different frequency distributions.

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4 Examples of Using ANOVA in Real Life - Statology

Details: Jan 31, 2020  · ANOVA is used in a wide variety of real-life situations, but the most common include: Retail: Store are often interested in understanding whether different types of promotions, store layouts, advertisement tactics, etc. lead to different sales. This is the exact type of analysis that ANOVA is built for. Medical: Researchers are often interested ...

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Point Estimate Calculator - Statology

Details: May 02, 2019  · To find the best point estimate, simply enter in the values for the number of successes, number of trials, and confidence level in the boxes below and then click the “Calculate” button. This calculator uses the following logic to determine which point estimate is best to use: If x / n ≤ 0.5, use the Wilson Point Estimate.

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How to Make a Frequency Polygon in Excel - Statology

Details: Apr 16, 2020  · Step 3: Create the frequency polygon. Next, we will create the frequency polygon. Highlight the frequency values in column C: Then go to the Charts group in the Insert tab and click the first chart type in Insert Line or Area Chart: To change the x-axis labels, right click anywhere on the chart and click Select Data. A new window will pop up.

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How to Plot an Equation in Excel - Statology

Details: Aug 03, 2020  · Example 1: Plot a Linear Equation. The following image shows how to create the y-values for this linear equation in Excel, using the range of 1 to 10 for the x-values: Next, highlight the values in the range A2:B11. Then click on the Insert tab. Within the Charts group, click on the plot option called Scatter. We can see that the plot follows a ...

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